Artist's Biography

Susan Weaver describes her works as being the culmination of her imagination and reality.

She has been working as a fine artist for several decades and holds a Bachelor of Arts Visual Arts from the Newcastle College of Advanced Education.

Susan is inspired by the landscape and weather patterns, with many of her images created from memory. The themes in her paintings are often revisited over time, exploring the interconnections of living things and natural occurrences on the planet.

Susan constructs symbols in her works that have specific meaning to her. She is interested in the metaphysics of painting and the Aboriginal sense of place and the belonging to a pattern or cycle of life.

The works are often multi-layered with textures that revealing previous grounds that lie beneath the top surface, and her paintings show her love of colour and its multitude of combinations, which are an integral aspect of her practice.

During her career, Susan has exhibited her work widely throughout Australia, with showings at various commercial art galleries in Sydney, Newcastle, Lake Macquarie, Victoria and the Sunshine Coast.

She has received a number of commendations and prizes for her work, including:
1989 – Winner, Newcastle Mattara Art Prize
1993 – Winner, Regional Art Award, N.A.S.
1995 – Winner, Morisset Art Prize
1997 – Winner, BHP Art Prize

Susan’s works are represented in the several public and corporate collections, including: Newcastle Regional Art Gallery, Lake Macquarie Regional Gallery, Glasshouse Regional Gallery in Port Macquarie, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle Permanent Building Society, PWC: Price Waterhouse Coopers, and Shaw Gidley.

Writing about Susan’s work, Robert Cleworth from the Lake Macquarie Regional Gallery has said: “With their richly saturated and layered surfaces, the latest body of works by Susan Weaver is as much a celebration of surface and colour, as it is a metaphor for the creative act itself.

While she draws inspiration and compositional cues from specific geographic locations, Weaver’s works are not literal transcriptions of the landscape, Night-Lights on a horizon, for instance, or the reflections of light across a moonlit sea, serve more as symbolic suggestions than descriptions.

The artist’s repeated use of specific geometric and compositional elements (arcs, the horizon line, diagonals) are part of a private lexicon of motifs that are open to a range of possible interpretations. To this viewer, Weaver’s characteristic use of intense colour, the layered and scraped surfaces, repeated compositional elements and landscape subject, explore the processes of reflection and introspection that are the core of the creative.”